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Hot Tea Drops Recipe

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Love tea? You’re going to love these hot tea drops! These are homemade globes with a special recipe that will melt in hot water. It’s the perfect gift for any tea lover.

This is a great DIY project and there are many variations you can try depending on what flavor of tea you want it to be filled with.

Hot tea bomb in blue and orange sitting on a counter.

Homemade Hot Tea Drops

So far, we’ve been all over the melting drop trend with hot chocolate bombs and hot coffee melts, but what about the tea lovers? Don’t worry, we have you covered with these homemade hot tea globes.

What’s better than a hot cup of tea on a cold day? A homemade hot tea globe. This recipe is easy, fun to make, and tastes great! If you’re looking for unique tea gifts, these DIY beauties are an excellent option.

Orange and blue hot tea drops.

What you need to make hot tea drops

Here’s what you need to make this recipe. The exact measurements are in the recipe card below.

  • Isomalt Crystals
  • Gel Food Coloring (optional)
  • Tea of choice (can be bags or loose-leaf)
  • Small Saucepan
  • Large Cavity Semi-Sphere Silicone Mold

How to make tea bombs

Place the isomalt crystals into a small sauce pan and heat over medium-high heat.

Let the crystals melt. Shake the pan to evenly distribute the crystals if needed. Do not stir.

Once all the crystals have melted, work quickly to spoon the mixture into your semi-sphere molds. Be very careful to avoid contact with the skin. The liquid will be hot. Where sugar gloves for added safety.

Steps to make homemade hot tea drops

Add a few drops of food coloring into each mold if you choose. A little bubbling and sizzling may occur and that is okay.

Use a small spoon to mix the coloring with the melted crystals.

Using the back of a spoon, quickly spread the mixture to cover the entire surface of the mold. Do this step as fast as you can as it won’t take long for the mixture to begin to set.

Allow the halves to set up before continuing, about 30 minutes.

Remove the top half of the sphere from the mold by carefully pushing up from the bottom of the mold.

Leave the bottom half in the mold for now. This makes it easier to assemble the globe.

Place the tea in the bottom half of the orb along with any additions you plan to include (herbs, sugar cubes, edible flowers, etc.)

Leave the tea bag string outside the mold if you choose.

Process images of making hot tea drops.

Place a small skillet over low heat. This will be used to smooth the globe edges and help ease the joining of the two halves together.

Place the globe top onto the hot skillet for a few seconds to smooth and melt the edges. Quickly join it to the bottom half of the globe that is still in the mold.

Taking hot tea orbs out of the mold.

Let the orbs cool for 5-10 minutes. A few minutes after that, you should be able to remove the entire sphere from the mold by carefully pressing up on the mold to release the bottom half of the globe.

Pouring water into a mug with a bag of tea. 

To use, place a tea globe into a mug and pour hot water over it.

Mug with hot water and tea bag.

Watch it dissolve to reveal the tasty beverage! If you used food coloring, the tea will be that color.

Stir and enjoy.

Mug full of tea with a lemon.

Tea Globe Recipe Notes and FAQ

Do I need to add sugar to the tea drops?

Isomalt, which is used to create the orbs, is slightly sweet. If you like sweeter tea, you will want to add sweetener to the globes or to the hot tea once it’s made.

What kind of tea should I use in the bombs?

You can use tea bags or loose leaf tea inside the drops. You might have to fold the tea bag to get it to fit into the orb.

Are the tea bomb sturdy?

No. Tea drops are extremely fragile and must be handled with care. Keep this in mind if you are creating tea gift sets and package accordingly.

Blue orb with a tea bag string sticking out.

Are tea drops as easy to make as hot chocolate bombs?

No. Making tea globes is more labor intensive than make cocoa or coffee bombs. Your globes will improve with practice. When handling isomalt, use sugar gloves for added safety to help reduce the risk of burns.

Can I double or triple this recipe?

If you want to make more than two tea drops, it’s recommended to do so in multiple batches. Only make two tea globes per batch instead of doubling the recipe for best results. The isomalt mixture sets quickly and it’s difficult to get it properly placed into more than two molds at a time.

How do you store tea bombs?

Tea globes are best stored at room temperature. Refrigeration is not needed, but keep them away from moisture.

Yield: 2 Hot Tea Bombs (4 halves)

Hot Tea Globes

Hot tea bomb in blue and orange sitting on a counter.

Homemade hot tea drops.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup Isomalt Crystals
  • Gel Food Coloring (optional)
  • Tea of choice (can be bags or loose-leaf)

Instructions

  1. Place isomalt crystals into small saucepan over medium-high heat.
  2. Allow crystals to melt. If needed, shake pan to facilitate melting. DO NOT STIR.
  3. When all crystals have melted, work quickly to spoon mixture into semi-sphere molds. Be very careful to avoid contact with skin. This will be hot.
  4. Add a few drops of gel food coloring into each mold if you choose. This will bubble up and sizzle, that’s ok.
  5. Stir with a small spoon to mix with melted crystals.
  6. Using the back of the spoon, quickly spread mixture to cover the entire surface of the mold. Do this step as fast as you can, it won’t take long for the mixture to begin to set up.
  7. Allow halves to set up before continuing, approximately 30 minutes.
  8. Remove the top half of the sphere from mold by carefully pushing up from bottom of the mold. Leave the bottom half in the mold for now. This makes it easier to assemble the globe.
  9. Place tea in bottom half of globe in mold along with any edible flowers, sugar cubes, or herbs you are using. If desired, leave tea bag string outside the mold.
  10. Place small skillet over low heat. This will be used to smooth globe edges and ease joining the two globes together.
  11. Place globe top onto hot skillet for a few seconds to smooth and melt the edge. Quickly join to bottom globe that is still in the mold.
  12. Allow to cool 5-10 minutes. After a few minutes, you should be able to remove the entire sphere from the mold by carefully pressing up on the mold to release the bottom half of the globe.

Notes

  • Isomalt crystals are made with beet sugar and should not affect blood sugar. 
  • Tea globes made with isomalt crystals are slightly sweet. Sugar can be added to the cup for those preferring a sweeter taste. 
  • Tea bags may need to be folded to fit inside the globe.
  • Tea globes are extremely fragile. Use care when handling them.
  • Making tea globes is more labor intensive than making hot chocolate bombs. Globes will improve with practice.
  • Sugar gloves may be used to reduce risk of burns.
  • If using gel food coloring, the tea may have a tint of the color of the globe but it will not affect the taste of the tea.
  • If more than two tea bombs are desired, it is recommended that multiple batches are made (and only two tea bombs be made per batch) instead of doubling (or tripling) the recipe because the isomalt mixture will probably begin to set up before it can be properly placed in the molds and spread out.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

2

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 1Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 0mgCarbohydrates: 0gFiber: 0gSugar: 0gProtein: 0g

Nutrition facts are an estimate only.

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Blue ball tea drop and a mug filled with hot tea.

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